Archive | July 2014

Pangolin awareness hits the UK

Yesterday marked the launch of the campaign to scale up pangolin conservation by the IUCN SSC Pangolin Specialist group. This campaign is focused on protecting pangolin strongholds and reducing demand.

http://www.iucn.org/about/work/programmes/species/our_work/mammals/?17189/Eating-pangolins-to-extinction

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildlife/10996893/Scaly-anteaters-could-be-eaten-to-extinction-by-Asian-diners.html

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Sunda Pangolin releases 1stopbrunei

There are many organisations across Southeast Asia who are involved in the rescue and release of Sunda Pangolin. One organisation 1stopbrunei http://1stopbrunei.com/endangered/4584526605 work hard to rescue Sunda Pangolin and release them back into the wild.
They are a small but dedicated organisation who also do a lot of education work.

Take a look at their latest release

https://www.facebook.com/1SBWildlife

and have a look at their website for more videos of pangolin releases and the work they do with other wildlife.

Their dedication and love for wildlife is inspiring (and the photographs are pretty cool too!).

CITES and Pangolins

CITES, The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, recently held its standing committee meeting (SC65) in Geneva. In terms of pangolins signs were encouraging as thanks to the hard work of organisations such as the Tikki Hywood Trust and Annamiticus they finally began to get some of the recognition they deserve.

At the moment none of the 8 species of pangolin are listed on CITES Appendix l which is for those species who are most endangered and at risk of extinction. Appendix l prohibits international trade in specimens of these species. Pangolin are listed on Appendix ll; international trade of species on this list is authorized on the granting of an export permit or re export certificate. Fore more information see:
http://www.cites.org/eng/app/index.php

It is imperative to increase their protection and move all 8 species up to Appendix l. To those working closely with the species it is clear extent of the trade is having a detrimental effect on the population of the species and putting them at a real risk of extinction. Appendix ll is for those species who are not yet facing this real risk but may do in the future if the trade is not closely controlled, the plight of the pangolin is now beyond this point.

From the below links you can see that pangolins are now starting to get more recognition. A working group has been set up which adopted a mandate for tighter requirements on reporting the trade and conservation of pangolins.
http://annamiticus.com/2014/07/13/progress-pangolins-cites-meeting-geneva/


This is a great start but it is important to keep up the momentum generated.